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service awards should start at year one

Service awards should start at one year. Here’s why:

Service awards are something we always advocate for. But most companies leave it a few years to get them started.

We see our clients waiting until an employee has five, ten or even 20 years of service before they start recognising their staff. In our opinion, that’s far too late.

Service awards should start at one year for 5 reasons

It’s a small but important investment in the future

A lot of the power of recognition is in demonstrating that you’re interested and invested in your staff.

The first year of an employee’s time at your company is an important period. It’s time of adjustment, learning, and bedding in to a new place. A place you hope will be their home for a long time.

Tracking their first anniversary, and recognising, improves employee perception of their role. That perception endures as the years wear on, so it’s important to take early opportunities to build it.

Service awards are effective

Recognition has proven positive effects on engagement, productivity, motivation, loyalty and more. You can read more about the nitty gritty of that here, but the jist is simple.

When there’s so much evidence of the positive effects of recognition, you’d have to be mad to not jump on your first chance to use it.

It’s often expected

“Employees expect that someone at least remembers they’ve been there a year.”

Employees aren’t going to expect to get a cash-value reward after one year. But they will expect that someone at least remembers they’ve been there a year.

Even if it feels like it’s a small milestone for you, a year is a significant part of someone’s life to spend in one place.

Starting your service award schemes at one year makes that time feel well-spent. It also validates expectations from employees that their first first year get noticed.

You don’t have to pay for service awards

Recognition is as powerful, if not more powerful, than a cash-value item. You don’t have to put your hand in your pocket for an employee with one year under their belt.

Starting your service awards and recognition at one year only costs you a bit of time.

It’s good for your culture

Whenever you recognise someone in public, or hold up an achievement to the rest of your staff, you’re showing your employees something that you value.

In this instance, you’re showing that even the most modest loyalty is worthy of a celebration.

In turn, that’s a declaration to the rest of your staff to value loyalty and celebrate each other. Your leadership figures are the ones who need to take charge of that.

These things matter

Service awards are important. They drive quality relationships between staff, your leadership, and your company culture.

Starting at one year, you capitalise on the benefits of early recognition and set the tone for the future.

how much to set aside for years of service awards

How much should you spend on years of service awards?

Your business needs to recognise employees for staying with your company through years of service awards.

We’ve been saying it for years now: the milestones really do matter.

Even if you don’t think employees should get recognition for sticking with your company, your employees do.

A lot of employees think they should start being recognised for their loyalty after just one year.

They notice employers who miss their work anniversaries. That will affect how staff see their managers, how they see the company, and how they see themselves at work.

Cash-value rewards you dish out on top of that are trophies, persistent reminders of your appreciation for employee loyalty.

Trophies amplify recognition, but they don’t replace it.

With that in mind, we have a rough guide to scale years of service awards to cash-value rewards based on our experience with clients.

The loyalty to cash value scale:

  • Three years:
  • Up to £25
  • Fifteen years:
  • Up to £400
  • Five years:
  • Up to £140
  • Twenty years:
  • Up to £500
  • Ten years:
  • Up to £280
  • Fifty years:
  • Up to £1,300

So, there you go. A scale to operate to. But it feels kind of cold, right? Just numbers quantifying someone’s time into the value of a years of service award.

It’s not even like it’s a lot of money, it’s pretty reasonably priced. That’s because the recognition matters as much as the reward.

You have to put the effort in to make it spicy and exciting. Two things make a big difference: the manner of the award presentation, and what you use as a cash-value reward.

Humanising years of service awards with recognition

Recognition for loyalty needs to be personalised and public.

Leaders need to make the effort to personally show their appreciation for employees staying with the company.

Personalising recognition for loyalty shows managers are genuinely interested in their staff, making it more likely rewarding and recognising loyalty will have positive effects on staff.

Recognition for loyal service should be public. Open recognition has a greater impact on the employee, because it affirms the value of their place in the company.

Recognition being public also affects employees beyond the person being recognised. They see leaders valuing and appreciating other staff, and know in turn that both employees and loyalty are valued in the company.

Cash value, not cash

We’ve used the term cash-value, not cash, a few times in this blog. That’s no accident. We prefer non-cash for years of service awards.

That’s because cash makes a pretty poor employee reward. You can read all about that here, so we’ll spare you another slice of it.

There are a host of simple:

Choice

Let them pick a reward for themselves with gift cards, e-gift cards or a catalogue.

Training

Help employees reach their professional goals.

Time

Offer extra holiday days, or a sabbatical.

Trophies

Certificates, plaques and other trophies of service.

Control

If they’ve been pushing for a special project, let them spearhead it.

Experience

Organise an exclusive VIP experience for something they love.

Travel

Flights or accommodation to a dream destination.

Get started

If you don’t know your employees well enough to know what gets them excited, stick to offering choice.

Give employees access to a broad catalogue of rewards and let them pick something they can cherish at a cash-value level.

Don’t subject yourself to trying to maintain a catalogue of rewards for your own company. It’s a huge pain the in the neck. And you can rarely do as good a job internally as a specialist.

And a needless time-sink when you can use products like gift cards and e-gift cards to put rewards in the hands of staff.

You’ve got a guide to how to value years of service awards, now it’s time to put the effort in to maximise its positive effects for your business.

 

long service awards your employees actually want

Forget the carriage clocks: Long service awards gifts your employees actually want

Many companies don’t have an effective long service awards programme. If they even have one at all.

A lot of long service schemes focus on years of service that don’t even feel achievable for new staff. 10, 20 years of service.

And the rewards for long tenure are often underwhelming for employees that do last decades with the same company.

At the same time, employees still expect to see recognition, and earlier than you think.

Most employees anticipate some recognition for long service after just one year of service.

Knowing you need to recognise staff for long service is one thing. Knowing what works as long service award is something else though.

Employees are individuals. They have broad interests and varied personalities. Employers often find themselves at a loss when it comes to finding loyal service awards that actually work.

Instead of trying to find a single catch-all item which you can deploy for any employee, focus on variety and flexibility. Give your staff the chance to choose.

10 GIFT IDEAS FOR LONG SERVICE AWARDS

1. Experiences

Experiences are a thrilling way to celebrate long serving employees. This could include VIP sporting events, supercar experiences, spa days, skydiving or animal encounters.

2. Merchandise

Merchandise is a big tent. It could include your own products, bicycles, tech, hampers, wine, or watches.

The tricky part of choosing to reward with merchandise is getting the item exactly right.

For an effective long service award, you’ll need to have an intimate knowledge of what an employee is interested in. And know what items in that niche would be valuable to them.

3. Letter of thanks

letters of thanks make great long service awardsA letter of appreciation from senior management makes it clear to an employee that their service is noted, welcome, and valued.

While verbal recognition of their longevity in service is important, a physical token can be cherished. It serves as a continual reminder of the employee’s value.

4. Gift vouchers

Paper vouchers remain a massively popular item for our business clients for almost any reward and gift. Easy to buy, easy to give, easy for your staff to understand.

However, their effectiveness as business rewards can dwindle in some situations. When you’re measuring loyalty in decades, there are better options.

5. Gift cards

Gift cardsLove2shop Gift Cards have the advantage of functioning like vouchers without worrying about keeping a massive physical stock of paper.

They offer greater flexibility over vouchers in presentation, and in the amounts you want to reward.

6. Digital reward codes

Digital reward codes are simple and flexible.

While you’re trading off a small amount of the tangibility of vouchers and cards, the choice available is unmatched by other options.

Codes make it simple to issue long service awards to remote workers, or international workers. And you always have the option to back it up with a letter, verbal recognition or a certificate.

7. Cash

It’s natural for staff to ask for cash, and it makes gifts easy, but be wary.

Cash is taxed, and doesn’t feel as prized or special as compared to non-cash gifts. Cash is subject to all the same anxieties and stresses as monthly pay, unlike a special one-off gift.

We always recommend staying with non-cash long service awards.

8. Certificates or plaques

A certificate or award is a good physical token of the value of an employee’s longevity.

Whether they stay in the office or go on the mantelpiece, they’re a constant reminder of the company’s positive attitude towards the employee.

9. Travel

Travel is a great way to reward your valuable and loyal employees for long service.

Send your employee off for a weekend city break or a tranquil country retreat they’ve been thinking about for years.

10. Time off

A sabbatical is a great way to reward your longest-serving employees.

It gives them a chance to take a step back, recharge, and even work on some personal projects.

Alternatively, you could offer your tenured employee the chance to work on an deploying an internal project. Something that would be useful and effective but you struggle to find the time to develop.

Over to you

If your head is swimming, it kind of should be. Maintaining a huge catalogue of long service awards is no fun.

Instead of trying yourself, outsource it. Either let someone else manage a reward catalogue, or buy multi-retailer products so your staff can choose for themselves.

 

HowDoYourLSAStackUp

How Do Your Long Service Awards Stack Up?